Upping our Game: The Days of Awe


The days between Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur are days of awesome possibilities. However to access the great potential we need to “up our game” in performance of mitzvot. From ritual to learning, we all can achieve and push ourselves more and will reap the benefit in our relationship with God.

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Listening to the Call of Teshuva


We shift to LISTENING to the divine voice rather than perceiving God. Hashem SEES Israel on the three pilgrimage festivals, but on Rosh Hashanah God listens to the shofar which elicits divine mercy

“Teshuva is a unique divine creation, whose source is the holy of holies. Just as the ark transcended space, teshuva transcends time – it can therefore expand and encompass even the past.” Rav kook

A Secret Jewish Recipe for Long Life

elixer cupWhat would Dr. Oz and Oprah say about this?

For generations we have scoured the earth looking for the elixir of life. We want a secret potion that will guarantee us long and eternal life.

Our doctors have discovered that a good diet, exercise, and good genes, among other factors, all contribute to a long and healthy life.

Is there a Jewish elixir of life? YES!

Honey cake.

You see, our fate is as much a factor of good health as it is a good relationship with God. It has been scientifically proven that a healthy spiritual life is another good determining factor for the length and quality of life.

When we celebrate Rosh Hashanah, and connect on a spiritual level, we are helping to extend not only the duration, but the quality of our lives.

Come to shul, eat some honey cake, do some praying and introspection, and leave renewed and rejuvenated.

May you be written in the Book of Life for good health, happiness, success, and peace.

See you in shul,

Rabbi Yonah
Eventbrite - Days of Awesome 2013: A Divine High Holiday Experience

Our Rightful Place: Parashat Ki Teitze

road_hazard“During these days leading up to Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, we owe it to ourselves to help God restore our soul to its rightful place.” My Torah commentary on this week’s Torah Portion Ki Teitze appears in this week’s Jewish Journal:

“If you should see your friend’s ox or sheep straying, don’t ignore them. Instead return them to your friend. But if your friend is not close by, or you don’t know the owner, bring it to your home and hold onto it until the owner finds you, and then return it to them” (Deuteronomy 22:1-2).

Often the Torah will teach us a law whose idea we may have come up with ourselves. In other words, a law that just makes sense. These mitzvot are referred to as Mishpatim. God is reminding us of something. It makes sense that if we want to live in a society where people respect one another, we should be careful with each other’s property and actually look out for their property as if it were our own.

It is certainly important for Torah to provide us with a guide to decency. Yet, if the Torah is merely reminding us of something that makes sense, and something that we could have figured out ourselves, perhaps the Torah is also trying to convey to us something else. When the Torah exhorts us to respect one another’s property, creating a system of integrity of ownership and trust, it is offering us something so much deeper. Read More